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(In)organic and Mechanical Processes

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The gallery and publishing house Photo Edition Berlin presents four approaches to experimental analogue photography. Titled Raw Exposure, the exhibition continues until 13 February 2016.

Claus Stolz (born 1963) practices the most radical form of analogue photography. Where other artists capture objects  lit by sunlight, he points his camera straight at the sun. He has pursued this method for the past fifteen years, referring to it as 'heliography'. The results are determined by the degree of irradiation (which in some photographs is diminished or interspersed by clouds), the choice of camera type and settings (Stolz works with convex lenses with diametres of up to one metre), the choice of film as well as the specific film development technique.

Edgar Lissel (born 1965) has been an interdisciplinary visual artist since 1993. In his work he explores the relationship between natural sciences, art history, archeology and artistic intention, investigating visual processes and the ephemeral nature of the visual image. From 1993 to 1995, Lissel worked with a Camera Obscura – having turned a truck into a pin-hole camera. For subsequent projects, he went on to turn entire living spaces (1995 to 1997) as well as museum display cases (1999 to 2002) into a Camera Obscura. This was followed by investigations of the effect of direct light onto bacterial cultures, as well as utilising the phototaxic properties of cyanobacteria (the bacterias' tendency to move towards the light) in his artistic imagery.

The work of Austrian artist Harald Mairböck (born 1963) focuses on depicting the actual process of creating a photograph: the photographic paper serves as a pin-hole camera; the final image contains traces of the entire photographic process: the lens, the folded camera and the source of light, which defines the photograph in the conventional sense of the term.

In the years from 1985 to 1991, Jiří Šigut (born 1960) captured everyday activities such as bus, train or elevator rides with a permanent long-term exposure (shooting with open aperture) onto one single film negative – complementing his work with notes on the ambient noise and temperature. In the early nineties, the photographer began to shift his focus to nature, creating the series 'Records'. His natural sources of light – daylight, the light of the moon, the stars or the glow of a fire – are etched into the light-sensitive layer of photographic paper.

For further information visit Photo Edition Berlin

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